Make Musings

  • Drama unfurls and retracts. Seattle’s skies were dramatic this week.  From my office, I saw all of the beauty below in a matter of three hours.  The fog started us off, cloaking the shipyards in a dense blanket.  The fog was followed by heavy dark clouds and thick, fast, intense rain that swirled and danced between the top floors of the office buildings.  Then, as she is apt to do, our cloudy Seattle skies opened up and let a peek of her pretty blue show through.  The sparkling sun blinded me as it bounced from the waters of Puget Sound; it really was quite a show that I felt privileged to witness from my perch in the office.
  • Find the irony
  • Release. There are so many lessons in death. As in life, to be sure, but lessons stemming from death are filled with the weight of finality and somehow that makes it feel all the more significant. One of my personality quirks that has both benefitted me greatly and proven to be one of my biggest challenges is my desire to tightly control my environment.  Control is one of the tools I used to reach higher education with little help from others.  I believe it’s the tool that assisted me most in succeeding during my entrée into the initially foreign and, at one time, seemingly gilded legal profession.  Perhaps surprisingly, control has also benefitted my relationship with J. We are very similar in that we both feel the need to maintain control and we thoroughly enjoy order.  Most of the time, our teamwork is enhanced by our mutual desire to fully prepare for every scenario. One downside to this personality “quirk” is obvious and usually manifests in relationships with others.  Friends, colleagues, family—how strange that they may want to experience life other than in a manner I suggest at the time I think appropriate via the means I deem most suitable?  Ha! [I’m working ...
  • Perspective. I’ve felt a gentle pull toward writing for some time now.  It turns out that this space allows me and, sometimes, forces me, to consider details of this life that I may otherwise miss.  Reflections of the surrounding world in a giant store window.  The pattern of swirls in a chocolate confection.  A carefully sourced vignette of found objects collected in a corner of the neighborhood coffee shop.  Law professors, especially, like to call this detail-oriented, piece-meal approach to organizing thoughts and perspective as being in the trees.  Being in the trees, where you can really dig in and appreciate each branch and insect and footprint and wildflower, is sometimes the best. But, other times, it can be overwhelming and cause you to—wait for it—not see the forest.  I suppose part of my absence from here had to do with a desire to change my perspective and see the big picture.  As seasons change, the means to fulfillment ebbs and flows.  I feel (almost) recharged and ready to once again record the small happy moments in this space.  Coffee shop + writing + sunny day in September.  It feels good to be back.
  • Trial Prep Music Yes, it’s time to prep for another trial. The more I prep, the more I’m beginning to find what works, or what I think works. Music is an integral portion of my prep process. If I’m not listening to the right type of music, I can’t concentrate and I’ll spend hours getting little accomplished. I’m probably very late to the game on this one, but music from Tiesto, Avicii, Deadmau5, and Skillrex is finding its way into the rotation a lot more. S is not a huge fan, which means that when I’m working from home I’m often working for hours with these tunes blasting in my ears. When I’m done, I kind of feel like I just emerged from a sensory deprivation tank. Point being however, if you need some music that will keep you energetic and focused for sustained periods of time, give them a listen to. So excuse me, while I slip these headphones back on and get some work done.
  • Legal Words v. Regular Words While sitting across from S at a coffee shop, I’m sort of reading and sort of eavesdropping on the college-aged couple next to us. Their conversation touches on a variety of important topics, ranging from bathing suits to utility bills. But what really caught my attention was their use of the phrase, “strong-arm robbery.” They wonder, and for good reason, what is the difference between “robbery” and “strong-arm robbery.” Was the robber someone of particular strength? Was his other arm weak? I want to interject and tell them that it’s just theft done with force, but they find the answer on Google within seconds. The male in the couple takes issue with the fact that a robbery is defined with a hyper-technical definition. For instance, he dwells on the portion of the definition describing robbery as the taking of another’s property with the “intent to permanently or temporarily deprive” them of that property. The whole conversation, again still eavesdropping, reminds me of an Above The Law article that focused on 20, or rather twenty (20) lawyerisms. The gist of the article is that lawyers use unnecessarily complicated words or phrases for no particular purpose, except that it’s done that way. The number 1 lawyerism, is the use of “pursuant to.” I have to admit, I love ...
  • Exhausted, But Happy I’m starting to get the hang of this billing thing.  I’m learning that it’s much easier to bill projects to a handful of clients in one day than it is to bill 10+ clients (too much non-billable time is sucked up entering hours) or to bill just one client all day (3pm = sleepy time if there isn’t adrenaline pumping).  I’m learning that it’s not appropriate to say no to partners offering work, but it’s perfectly okay to tell them that other partners have given me priority projects and to please tell me where their project falls in line.  So far this has worked well.  But then, there are days like today where companies are being sold and notice must go out tomorrow and we need to know ASAP if the statute of limitations runs out tomorrow and the senior partner—your mentor—returns to the office in a few days expecting your (first ever!) motion to be drafted in perfect form, oh and there are a few liens to check on in the spare time you saved.  Except you didn’t.  So now you have a young lawyer event to attend tomorrow night and about 8 billable hours to complete 12 hours ...
  • Grief is Intoxicating and Weird: Part II J and I watched the film “Beginners” this weekend. It is good. You should see it. Actually, we watched it in a two-part series on Friday and Saturday night. I have this issue where I can’t make it through a movie in one sitting without falling asleep. It’s ridiculous. But it’s fact. So we make do and split up films into series, especially for the home viewing. About two minutes into the movie, I realized that it was during an NPR interview with Beginners’ writer/director Mike Mills where I heard the phrase “Grief is intoxicating and weird.” Mike was talking about the loss of his mother and father and when he made that statement, it felt like he was talking directly to me. Something strange happened last night before we watched our second installment of the movie. An ex-boyfriend friended me on facebook. This person goes way back to my freshman year of high school. Not even half of my current life had yet been lived when we dated. Significantly and deeply jarring to me, I realized this person knew me and my brother during a very important time in our sibling relationship: the last year of my brother’s ...
  • Snow Days for Adults Being a 20something year old lawyer who gets a snow day is just as awesome as being a 10 year old who gets a snow day. Except better. See, when you’re a kid and you get a snow day, you don’t have to go to school and and you get to play in the snow. When you’re an adult and you get a snow day, you get to play in the snow, and you get paid to not go to work, and you get to go to happy hour (really early). So, it should come as no surprise that I took advantage of all of these activities yesterday. But I also took time to do something that I have not done in a long time. Read for fun. One of the downsides (or upsides, depending which side of the coin you belong to) of being a lawyer is that you read, a lot. And sometimes, it’s really dry or boring. Or terribly boring. So, I fired up the old e-reader – because I don’t like killing trees and love me some high-tech gadgetry – and downloaded an e-book. Allow me to have a momentary flashback. In my senior year of high school, I took an advanced ...
  • Billing Time When I put my mind to something, I highly prefer for that thing to go smoothly. I tend to set high standards for myself when it comes to my career, which has generally served me well. But I’m also impatient and I expect things to come together right.this.second. When it comes to a learning curve, I’m not so comfortable on the incline side. So it turns out, despite my best efforts, it is not possible to bill 95% of the time I spend at work. Ha! Say the lawyers who read this blog. Ha! Say my friends who have warned me for a long time that billing isn’t so easy. I typically spend 9 hours a day at work, which is really pretty light for a private civil lawyer. On my best day, I spent about 10 hours at work and billed 8.6. On my worst day, I was there for about 9 hours and only billed 5 (note: I am now much less ...
  • A New Beginning It has been a whirlwind week. I had so much anticipation leading up to my first day of work at the law firm. I wasn’t worried about performing well or fitting in or billing hours for the first time or being overwhelmed by new areas of law (although all of those things were certainly on my mind). It was the dual prospects of a much-needed new beginning and the feeling of having made it that pulsed through my body, physically manifesting in the form of anticipatory tension. I’m happy to report that, so far, this new life is fantastic. For context, you should know that the firm considers itself a “lifestyle firm.” It has a relatively fancy office with fabulous views of Puget Sound, but people generally seem to show up before 9 and leave before 6. I’m not making big firm money, but I feel pretty lucky that they are paying for my parking spot in the building (as far as I know, a perk virtually unheard of for Seattle associates) and I feel completely comfortable with the compensation. The partners are steadily knocking on my door with projects. I billed over 7 hours a majority of days last ...
  • Digital Cameras and Paseo The upside to digital cameras is that they are easy to carry and they avoid the frustrating moment when you realize you paid to develop a roll of blurry photos. The downside to digital cameras is that the ability to store thousands and thousands of shots means the photographer fails to exercise any discretion whatsoever. So, if you are like me, you end up with hundreds of random photographs to sort through every couple of months. This is why my posts, unlike S’s, never correctly correspond to the right time of year. Take this post for instance. Sure, it’s early January, but I’m writing about the night that S and I went to Paseo and then sat in warm sun at Gas Works Park. Paseo is the place to go for Cuban sandwiches. It’s been featured on the Food Network a bunch of times and standing in an hour-long line, only to be told that they ran out of bread and are closing early, is seen as a badge of honor, not an act of stupidity. Ordering at Paseo shares a similar pleasantness as Seinfeld depicted ordering at the “Soup Nazi.” You stand in a tightly packed line, because you don’t trust that the ...
  • make happy in the new year J and I have never really explained the meaning behind the name of this little blog. In some ways, it’s pretty self-explanatory. But it’s also grammatically incorrect, which may seem like a strange choice for two Type-A lawyers whose shared profession is deeply rooted in the ways of wordsmiths. About a year ago, J and I had a conversation about setting intentions in our marriage and for the life we were building together. It was one of those discussions that was deeply meaningful to us and extraordinarily personal. The kind that makes one feel wholly and completely why the decision between two people to share their one life together, forever, is a sacred one. We agreed that, despite the hardships and adversity that continually pop up in life, we wanted to be happy. Because, if not for happiness, what is the point of living this life? Sometimes, though, being happy is awfully challenging when surrounding circumstances are bleak or stressful or downright depressing. So we decided that we would have to actively engage in creating our own happiness or, in other words, to make happy. [Note: We also toyed around with the idea that to create happiness we need to share and ...
  • Bus Moments A brief disclaimer… I’m writing this on my iPhone while riding the bus, so forgive any typos. Dhsohhxjekd. The bus, despite all its good, can downright suck at times. Take right now for instance. We have moved about 21 feet within the last 34 minutes. Not impressive. However, cars blocking intersections and passengers who “forget” that they have to pay is not even the highlight of tonight’s ride home. It’s the couple that is alternating between hitting each other in the face and licking each other’s neck that I find worth noting. I’m not certain….wait, I have to make room for the drunk guy… So, I’m not certain whether they are playfully hitting each other or not. I can hear the sound of the “hit” over my music. But they seem to be laughing. Oh, the drunk guy just wanted to sit. He’s talking to his mom. Complaining that his brother is a deadbeat and a criminal. On the bus. Loudly. He is “the good son.” If memory serves, there was a crummy movie with Mculloy (sp?) Caulkin entitled, “The Good Son.” Where was I? Right, domestic violence on the bus with dozens of witnesses. To punish the “hitter” for his ...
  • Seven Extra Minutes Over the past couple of weeks we’ve been doused with buckets and buckets of, well, life. Some of the buckets were filled to the brim with the very best of what life has to offer and others, not so much. What have we been up to? Both of us have been elbows-deep in case prep, suiting up far more often than we’d like for the courtroom, packing lunches and planning dinners in an attempt to abide by our short-lived “whole food challenge” (read: no processed food & no sugar), visiting a beloved 91-year-old Grandmother, sprucing up our living quarters, celebrating birthdays, lawyering it up for weekend conference meetings, attending nuptials, and processing good ol’ family drama. Oh, yes. And J PASSED THE BAR EXAM! Last Saturday, in between meetings at my conference, I came home to stalk the mail carrier for The Letter. When our mail carrier eventually showed up, he kindly sorted through his stack and found our mail first. The Letter was in my hand. But then the mail carrier proceeded to hold me hostage for at least 7 minutes telling me about his drug-addicted friend who won’t get help and who doesn’t appreciate his support. I was ...
  • Where is J? I’m here. I swear. After I finished the bar exam, I spent a few weeks playing house-husband. This involved running errands, making dinner, and taking four hour naps in the various parks throughout Seattle. If it weren’t for having Stella with me, I may have been mistaken for a vagrant. Then I went to work. It was like I never left. I walked in on my first day, my co-workers greeted me, and then a paralegal handed me a stack of files, informing me that I had a trial in two weeks. So, I spent the next couple of weeks preparing for a trial. Trial went well. I won. But in the process, I got allergic to computers, so I didn’t post anything. Sorry. I’ll write more soon. But, let’s face it – S is the more interesting writer.
  • Finicky Seattle The calendar tells me that fall has arrived. But Seattle’s finicky weather patterns seem to be having a bit of a disagreement with the calendar. It was blustery and rainy last night and through much of this morning. But it’s also muggy. And this afternoon boasted the charming bright-blue sky that makes people fall in love with our city and want to move here, despite its reputation for hefty investments in gore-tex and rain boots. The mugginess has resulted in conditions that are far too hot for sleeping. And too hot for doing much of anything when the sun pours into our condo during the afternoon (it’s especially too hot to make homemade sweet potato fries by broiling them on high, an unfortunate lesson I learned on Friday evening). It’s a strange place, Seattle. Summer arrived so late that no one is willing to nay-say anything sun or warm-weather related. But I’m not gonna lie—it’s an uncomfortable feeling to sweat it out while laying in bed at 2am in late September. We took advantage of a break in the (hot) rain this morning to take a long walk with Stella. We had fresh-brewed coffee in hand and ventured to the boat houses ...
  • 9/11 On the morning of 9/11, I was on summer vacation in between high school and college. I was supposed to go the city that morning, but as I walked downstairs I saw on the news that the first plane hit the WTC and for the rest of the day I sat and watched the news and talked with friends whose parents would be at or near Ground Zero. Due to my Dad’s job at the time, he had to go into the city the next few days. I went with him and walked as close as possible to Ground Zero. Aid workers already constructed barriers prohibiting people from getting too close, but barriers can’t stop you from seeing a black cloud looming over most of Manhattan. A barrier can’t stop you from smelling the burning fires. I moved to Seattle 12 days after 9/11, unsure whether I would take a plane, a train, or drive. While there was little that I could contribute at the time, I’ve always felt guilty leaving New York after 9/11. 10 years later, I still have trouble processing feelings about 9/11. Anger and sadness are the primary emotions, but there is the occasional pang of guilt. ...
  • Conehead Dog Our dog, Stella, has a hot-spot on her hind leg (I dabble in veterinary medicine). In order to prevent her from licking the area, I bought her a cone. What I did not anticipate was how dumbfounded Stella would become. After putting the cone on her the first time, she stood in the same spot for 30 minutes. Consecutively. I tried to get her to sit – she refused. I called for her to follow me – she ignored me. I turned the lights off – she stood in the dark. When she finally decided to walk around, she resembled a ball trapped inside a pinball machine, bounding off every wall in a zigzag.
  • Scoot Scoot I want a scooter, Vespa preferably, but S kindly reminds me that I have some law school debt to pay back first. Earlier this “summer”  we rented a couple of scooters and hit the road in an effort to enjoy some Seattle sun (apparently too much to ask for) and feed the scooter need (only made me want one more). Unfortunately, the sun was not on our side, but at least we learned that it is not utterly terrifying to ride a scooter in the rain. The only major fail of the day was when a driver flipped me off and then sped around me with his tires screeching. Clearly he was jealous that he did not get to drive a scooter in the rain.
  • Post-Bar Update As the recent Spain posts indicate, S and I celebrated the finale of 6 years in law school (3 for her, 3 for me) by taking off for Spain . . . a mere 5 hours after I uploaded my final answer for the Washington Bar Exam. Studying for the bar sucks. There is no more eloquent way to put it. For roughly 60 days, I studied about 12-14 hours per day. I took 1 full day off (the 4th of July) during which time, I agonized over not studying. A popular analogy for the bar exam is that you learn a little about a lot. I like to think of it as cocktail party law – I can tell you what is required to set up a trust for your kids, but hell-no would I feel comfortable doing it with no experience. While studying for the bar sucks, sitting for the actual test is terrifying. The exam is held in a convention center that looks like any other convention center you’ve seen: sterile, square, decorated with a lot of brown. During the exam, however, the room is full with 800 test takers. To say the energy in the room is electric ...
  • Bar Prep–Day 42 Our substantive “crash course” review classes ended last week (Yay!) and now I’m on my own, working on fine-tuning the last minute details (Oh, fudge). As the exam is a mere 2 weeks away, my patience seems to have a inverse relationship with my anxiety. Take the below email exchange between S and I from this afternoon, for instance. I am very thankful she managed to make me laugh, calming me down, focusing my energies on studying, and keeping me from ending up on the 10 o’clock news as the feature story of the guy who flipped out in a coffee shop. Oh, in case it’s a surprise, I’m a humongous fan of numbered lists. And I inserted some comments in brackets to explain some things. from: J to: S subject: I am having a bad day . . . . . . and I need to vent about everything that is bothering me so that you can tell me to chill the heck out. I didn’t do my CrossFit work out as prescribed this morning. Best Buy – I hate that company almost as much as Comcast. If I become rich, I’ll buy both companies, liquidate the assets, and give the money to charity. [Our camera, ...
  • Giveaway Winner Congratulations, Miss Brittany Cox! J and I were so excited when random.org chose the hilarious writer of the blabbery as the winner of Tropical Depression by Arin Greenwood. You should check out Brittany’s blog! Thank you to Arin Greenwood and publisher Back Porch Books for participating in our giveaway.
  • Giveaway Hi friends! Please remember to go here to enter our giveaway for a chance to win Tropical Depression by Arin Greenwood. It’s a fun, easy summer read. I really enjoyed the book and I know you will, too!
  • *GIVEAWAY* Tropical Depression by Arin Greenwood Tropical Depression by first-time novelist Arin Greenwood is light-hearted, funny and different than anything I’ve read. Greenwood kindly sent me a copy of her book to review and I inhaled the quick read in no less than one weekend (this was fast for me these days, since I read and write for a living and tend to shy away from reading on my down time). The novel–not a memoir–is loosely based on Greenwood’s personal experience transitioning from what us lawyer folks call life as a Big Law associate raking in the cash and living with her serious boyfriend in New York (i.e., living the so-called lawyer dream) to suddenly-single law clerk working for a wackadoo judge on a teensy-tiny tropical island. The line between reality and fiction in the novel is blurry, but I sincerely hope (for Greenwood’s sake) that the ridiculous polyester-based wardrobe forced upon the main character by her boss rests more in fiction than reality… Chit-chattin’ with Arin Greenwood: S: You’ve said it took awhile for you to finalize your first book. What would you say to other first-timers out there who are struggling to put pen to paper, so to speak? AG: For me, getting into a writing routine is the ...
  • What I (J) have been up to . . . As you may have seen me say once, twice, or five-hundred-sixty-seven times, I graduated law school a couple of weeks ago.  Since I’m not a real human lawyer yet, my future employer can’t allow me to work full time.  Needless to say, I’m enjoying some much-deserved and much-appreciated down time before I start the soul-crushing preparation for the bar exam. Despite my desire to watch Law & Order: SVU episodes all day, I have tried to stay somewhat active.  One activity I ramped up over the past few weeks is my freelance writing.  Yep, I’m like an XY version of Carrie Bradshaw minus the pumps and the dramatic relationships.  While I certainly don’t write for a magazine as glamorous as Vogue, I enjoy writing for Thrillist Seattle.  It’s an online magazine that is geared towards men, filled with some funny and usually obscure jokes that even I don’t get.  But more importantly, it gives me something fun to write about, allows me to meet new restaurant owners, and see more of Seattle. About a year or so ago, Seattle, like Portland, discovered that food from trucks tastes awesome.  One of the more popular food trucks in Seattle is Skillet.  What started as ...
  • Mappin’ It Out Does this accurately represent your people? I kinda think it hit the nail on the head with the Pacific Northwest. Other regions might be less enthusiastic…(serial killers, obesity, potatoes = yikes).
  • School’s Out FOREVER! Congrats, J! You made it through three arduous years of law school: reading Blackstone, learning to write in IRAC (issue-rule-analysis-conclusion…or did they not teach that at your fancy-pants #1 ranked writing program?), getting to know Judge Learned Hand’s style, moving from a frappuccino-with-whip-sipper to straight up no-milk-in-my-americano-thankyouverymuch-gulper, italicizing (or not, depending on the citation) your commas and periods, becoming intimate with footnotes, building a sweet tie collection (mostly blue and red if you want to win the jury’s approval save the pink paisley for weddings), bluebooking the heck out of your papers, making sure your contracts meet all four corners, defining res ipsa loquitur (shouldn’t the definition speak for itself? Ha!), becoming so particularizing that family members question your sanity, thinking like a lawyer but not learning the law sufficiently enough to pass the bar exam without taking an entirely separate overpriced bar review course, owning many leather bound books which you will never again open, earning the right to be called a juris (read: fake) doctor!, and joining a profession that, despite what the naysayers and cynics say, truly is worthy because on balance it does good in our society and, at least sometimes, effectuates justice. Bravo, J! You done made me proud. [Photo ...
  • We be tweet tweetin’ S and I decided to make like a Kardashian sister and join Twitter.  Of course this was not as easy as it should have been.  I really thought that we should have a feed to our Twitter name (@MakeHappyBlog) in the right column.  But, for some reason, the tool that makes this widget on Twitter is really, really buggy.  Also, I tried to enter the code right into our webpage’s html.  Bad things ensued.  First, the spacing was off.  Then the right column disappeared entirely.  Then there was a huge blue bird at the top of the screen.  Then the Twitter feed came up, but the text was a weird color.  I got annoyed, I said mean things about the Twitter bird. After that was all over, things somehow fell back into place.  Our blog looks like it’s back to normal.  Spacing looks right.  Me and the blue bird are on good terms again.  So, what’s the bottom line?  Follow us on Twitter @MakeHappyBlog.
  • Ice Cream. You Scream. We All Scream for Ice Cream! Children were everywhere. Toddling, eating, sipping, peering, falling, playing, picking, running, screaming. We were overwhelmed. I’m 100% sure that, without ever speaking about it aloud, J & I silently agreed that it’s much more fun at *this point in our lives* to enter an ice cream shop and make a quick escape to the sidewalk, away from the little ones, than it would be to stay and baby-wipe the chocolate drippings from sticky fingers. One day, bring on the tiny, chubby sticky fingers! But not quite yet. Back in the day, I used to frequent this ice cream shop regularly. By back in the day, I mean back in my college student/babysitter/nanny days. That period in my life was kind of amazing. I mean, really. I was paid to hang out with seriously awesome kids, eat ice cream occasionally and spend an inordinate amount of time at parks throughout the fancy-pants neighborhoods of Madrona and Madison Park . Scoop du Jour was the place to be from 2001-05.  And it still is. I have to admit, even though J is an excellent ice cream mate, I missed my little cronies who I used to take to this sweet little shop (one ...
  • 7 Facts About Us MJ from WanderWonderDiscover awarded us a “Stylish Blogger Award.”  We’re pretty honored that someone thinks we’re stylish.  If you’ve ever seen or received this award, then you know that the recipients must report 7 facts about themselves and then pass the award to other bloggers, asking them to do the same.   Here are 7 facts about us: In 2007, while searching for a secret beach in Cinque Terre, Italy, we, in all seriousness, thought we might be killed while we walked through a mile-long pitch black abandoned train tunnel that was full of squatters’ goods, ditched trailers, and empty jugs of wine.  We found the beach, we didn’t die. We got married twice.  Both times to each other.  Once legally on our parents’ shared anniversary (seriously, same day and year) and once in the traditional sense (church, white dress, you get the idea). Our wedding rings have a shared secret inscription.  They read, “promises must be kept” in Latin.  It’s a legal phrase… we’re dorks. Four years ago, we accidentally purchased the same style of hiking shoes.  Today, we plan on buying some Toms; we don’t plan on buying matching styles.  We’ll keep you posted. Every Sunday, we read our horoscopes from the Stranger out loud ...
  • School Picture Day
  • On The Bus: Buses Are heavy I partake in the Seattle bus system (King County Metro) fairly regularly.  In general, I like public transportation – I don’t particularly love to drive, I save gas (and money), I help the environment, and I’m easily entertained. After I told S that I wanted to write short posts about some of the funnier moments I have experienced, she cautioned that I probably shouldn’t turn the posts into a rant.  I’ll make every attempt not to be too negative, but for all the odd experiences I’ve had on the bus, I still continue to choose to ride them.  Today, I’d like to talk about how buses are heavy.  Like really, really heavy.  It’s a fact that I would think everyone knows, right?  I think it’s pretty obvious that the heavier the vehicle, the more stopping distance you need.  So why do most bus drivers insist on driving the bus like they drive a much lighter Honda Civic.  See that stop sign coming up?  If you’re driving a bus at 35mph, it’s going to take more than 7 feet to stop, unless of course you want every passenger to lunge forward.  And how ironic is that!  Buses are driven in ways that ...
  • I love goooold. Yep, that’s right,  My Starbucks Gold Card came in the mail today.  Now, if this isn’t the power of marketing, I’m not sure what is.  As you can see from my card, I’ve had an active Starbucks Card account since 2008.  But, its taken me three years to reach gold status.  However, for some reason that only the marketing powers can answer, when I found I was within striking distance of a gold card, I started chugging Americanos like they were going out of style.  And now I have a gold card… with a $0 balance… and almost no interest in using it.
  • Seen Locally
  • Sunset: Lake Union Good news.  Sunsets are here!  Evenings like these make us so thankful for our home and our view.
  • Never, never giving [J] up I received some great news on the job front this week…but it’s still been a challenging, cranky kind of  a week for me.  Don’t you hate when that happens?  When you know great things are in the making, that are 100% worth celebrating with a live-out-loud moment, but you still feel like you’re in a funk?  Well, J brought me flowers, both to celebrate the job accomplishment and to cheer me up.  He’s a dream. J doesn’t know it, but I often listen to Lullaby, a Dixie Chicks song, and think of him.  He kind of rocks my world.  In a big, big way. They didn’t have you where I come from Never knew the best was yet to come Life began when I saw your face And I hear your laugh like a serenade How long do you want to be loved Is forever enough, is forever enough How long do you want to be loved Is forever enough Cause I’m never, never giving you up As you wander through this troubled world In search of all things beautiful You can close your eyes when you’re miles away And hear my voice like a serenade How long do you want to be loved Is forever enough, is forever enough How long do you want to be ...
  • A Nostalgic Week Seems like everywhere I turned this week, I saw some signs of other bloggers referencing nostalgic moments.  First, there was Design Mom, who posted about a Ferris Bueller Board game, by Max Dalton.  In retrospect, I may have been a few years to young to appreciate this movie when it first came out.  I thought it was a really big deal that Ferris and Sloane kissed and I would never, never, consider stealing (borrowing) my dad’s car.  I remember begging my parents for the VHS (yep, VHS).  Eventually, I watched Ferris annoy Cameron until the tape wore out.  My second run-in with nostalgia came while I read Thought Catalog.  They posted about a video, commissioned by SkyOne that translated the Simpsons to real life.  When I was younger I was always amazed how cutting edge the Simpsons were. Some of my friend’s parents even forbade them from watching such a cartoon.  In turn, I thought I was so cool because I was allowed to watch the Simpsons even though I was not allowed to watch Beavis and Butthead.  Come Home To The Simpsons from devilfish on Vimeo. My final dose of nostalgia was courtesy of Orange Juice Etc.  ...
  • [via NY Times] 36 Hours in Seattle Visit Seattle!  David Laskin of the New York Times has his finger on the pulse of our city. “Seemingly overnight, whole swatches of downtown and close-in neighborhoods — notably South Lake Union and the Pike-Pine Corridor — have transformed themselves into vibrant enclaves of restaurants, bars and galleries. With so many converted and repurposed buildings, Seattle’s cityscape is starting to look as layered as the wardrobes of its inhabitants.” He hits on many of Seattle’s well-known and secret hot spots.  More importantly, he discusses many of our most-loved places: Volunteer Park Cafe (be prepared for child overload during weekend brunch!), Elliot Bay Book Company (beautiful space, super helpful employees), Oddfellows (breakfast sandwiches = yum), Licorous ($1 taco Tuesdays), Sitka & Spruce (out of control brunch), The Olympic Sculpture Park (gorgeous Puget Sound views) and Volunteer Park (nestled among fancy homes, an escape in the city). Read more here.
  • Scootin’ About J has been asking me for ages if we should buy a scooter.  Of course I want to zip around town on a cute little Vespa LX50.  Preferably in mint green (does that model come in mint green?).  With my fresh produce from Pike Place securely fastened in one basket and my yoga mat in the other.  But there are practicalities.  Like paying for it.  Getting a license to legally drive it.  Parking it.  Finding a helmet that won’t give me hat hair.  Not to mention the fact that Seattle is a city of rain.  And freeways.  He sent me this photo from The Sartorialist yesterday as inspiration.  What do you think – should we take the scooter plunge?
  • Happynomics It looks like J & I aren’t the only ones pursuing happiness.  The Brits (well, at least their Prime Minister and his cronies) are creating a national happiness index and New York Times’ op-ed columnist Roger Cohen wrote an interesting piece on the issue.  Read it here. He says, “Clearly, happynomics is no precise science, and how the happiness index will link to policy remains to be seen. But the idea is to put value on things that don’t have price tags. Open spaces, clear air, security, release from pressure — these are things of growing importance and scarcity.” I agree – let’s put more energy into valuing the important things in life, those things that MAKE HAPPY.  By the way, I’d add to his list tasty food and time with loved ones.  What would you add?